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country. your choice. >>> we would like to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world to this, the democratic national convention, as charlotte, north carolina. i'm on the convention floor, i'm wolf blitzer. the first lady of the united states, michelle obama, has tonight's most critical job, reminding voters why they liked her husband enough to put him in the white house, and to make the case for giving him another four years. ining us now inrco all of thiweek,nderson cooper, high above the floor. >> our w sws whyhat case is more urgent than ever for the democrat. nesn mitt romney's convention bous. what are the numbers? their convtion tonight, ts let'slook at that very question. we know governor romney got a one-point bounce out of his convention, not so great, about half what the president got four years ago. not a big bounce. where does that leave us? the democrats' opening night two months from a critical election day. doesn't get any closer than that. 48-48. >> the convention will pay tribute to a champion of health care reform, the late senator edward kennedy,
of the people of in land of these united states. you have brought us here from every place on earth that native americans and immigrant americans, people of color and of every town might find not just hope, but a land which seeks life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. grant a deep and abiding respect for the task at hand so that our common efforts will perfect our desire that law and government before and by the people assist us to set aside personal differences so that the unity of purpose that we have will rise above us all as a symbol of freedom and let free them so rain in our hearts that we would never fear to lead the oppressed to freedom. never fear to get shelter the the homeless and displaced. never fear to treat our neighbors as ourselves. to give dignity and opportunity in mon-khmer get to the struggling unemployed and less fortunate brothers and sisters. let us never be afraid. while our prayers and assistance with those affected by hurricane isaac, we trust in you that your gracious luck will be with our president barack obama with our vice-president joe biden, with all of ou
for this is the books are conceived as a history of the united states sort of as told through biographies and i was looking for a woman subject for one of these and in fact i found one but my publisher wouldn't let me do it. can you guess what woman i was looking for and found? eleanor roosevelt. i mean, just the fact that it's a very short list of women who played a large role in american public life on whom i can hang a tale of four or five decades of american history. women have had of course their roles in private life but it is in the nature of private life it usually doesn't survive in the historical record. why did people start saving the letters of eleanor roosevelt? because she was important. do your correspondence save your letters that you write to them and then do they deposit them in the local historical society? well, maybe, and if they do you will become, can i use my words adviseably, here, you will become literally immortal. you will become immortal in letters because future historians will find those letters. they will say ah, that is what life was like at the beginning of the
'm not trying to say new york is the only place in the united states that this has happened. but wars have often been an occasion for unity, for cohesion. you know, we're all in this together. we've all got to win this together, so we've got to put our more parochial interests aside and pulled together to win whatever word might be. but at the same time, new york is the great magnet for immigrants, from around the world from its very earliest days in the 1620s onward has been a place where discrete, separate populations of newcomers have often brought their own political culture, their own loyalties and allegiances come in their ethnic and national religious cultures and have ended up jostling each other often. and especially at times of war, this has been the case in new york. sometimes with tragic consequences. so i'm going to start by showing you these images, starting with the civil war. and again, the book starts well before that, but this is where we're starting today. so this is april of 1861, after the confederacy fired on fort sumter in this world war began. this is one of the mass rall
: former president of the united states, bill clinton, his speech hasn't been vetted by the obama team. all of the speeches except for clint eastwood. we want to make sure they stay on message. is it another loose cannon and look at what bill clinton said in the last three months, he's disagreed on major policies like extending the bush tax cuts and not having a millionaire's tax. the president wanted that. and he said romney had a stellar business career. i >> brian: he writes long hand on yellow paper. it is not like can i go on long hand. i am writing it out. they have an idea roughly of what he's going together. he's confident yet nervous about the content. >> steve: i read that on cbs and i read that the senior democrats are nervous. bill clinton and barack obama do not like each other and there is a blockbuster report out of the new yorker that has a quotation from 2008,oon arcticle by rina liza, bill said to ted kennedy when he was trying to get kennedy to support clinton. a few years ago he would be carrying our bags, referring to the president of the united states. it is out there
because i'm sure they see the politics at play as well. >> i don't think the united states would encourage israel to contact the attack because they don't have the capability to do much damage to the nuclear program. it doesn't do much damage to iran's nuclear program but would lead to retaliation and other downside risks. it seems like what the administration is trying to do is slow the program down as much as possible with sanctions, sabotage and other things. try to get a negotiate ed settlement. the president would be willing to use military force to stop iran if we get to that point. >> sounds like we'll be talking about this a few more times. thank you so much. >>> top of the hour. president obama is making his way to charlotte for his party, the big convention. you see the folks shaking hands. if he watches tonight from the road, which is where he is right now, he will see his wife. he'll see the first lady addressing the charlotte democrats. he'll also see julian castro, the rising star. i want to play some sound of the president campaigning today. he's critiquing mitt ro
platform when it comes to the critical relationship between the united states and israel. what's going on? we'll have details. eeeee! yeah. i get all my friends' pics as soon as they take them. really? you just missed an awesome dance off between the dads. oh... wow! (laughing) you just missed the cake fight. seriously? everyone's taking pictures like they're paparazzi. are we missing that? we're not, check it out. aww, yeah, haha. excuse me. vo: get all your friends' photos automatically with share shot on the galaxy s3. hey! first dance! are you kidding me??? i'm also a survivor of ovarian a writand uterine cancers. i even wrote a play about that. my symptoms were a pain in my abdomen and periods that were heavier and longer than usual for me. if you have symptoms that last two weeks or longer, be brave, go to the doctor. ovarian and uterine cancers are gynecologic cancers. symptoms are not the same for everyone. i got sick...and then i got better. [ "the odd couple" theme playing ] humans. even when we cross our "t"s and dot our "i"s, we still run into problems -- mainly other humans.
of the united states. someday it will be a woman. someday it'll be a hispanic or another white male. the americans have a good grasp of that. what dole said -- joel said is right on target. that is not a priority in terms of trying to message on the president's race. >> when you're talking about any ism, we have both been in situations where we have been treated sexistly. it is much more powerful when john paulson out than we do. -- calls it out than when we do. >> allow to push back that republicans are the only -- i want to push back on the thought republicans are only pushing the wedge issues. obama the same mitt romney will support you. how is that any different than what the republicans are doing? >> they brought it up. we did not. if john had said we are going to get the run on the war on women. they're going to do with the birth control and everything else. we would have said everything was settled in 1960. i do not think they will be that stupid. that is a moderate governor hugh did not have that record in massachusetts. these stands were unimaginable two years ago. we would
.s. prospers. to say manufacturing jobs in general are going to come back to the united states. most chinese products of low cost are going to go other places. they aren't coming back to the u.s. we have to recognize there's a dramatic ure ing in the world and everybody is part participating in it. >> we know the competitive situation always leans towards china because they've got much lower, you know, costs there. so companies are going to send workers to china and going to manufacture in china. what's great about china slowing down for the u.s.? >> i would agree with robert that, yes, there's a structural rebalancing going on. but this rebalancing is great because this enables for china's middle class to grow and create a service sector which can generate continued higher wages. that allows the private sectors in the developed economies to sell to china's middle class and not just depend on america's middle class. this way it gives a new engine of growth for nations around the world. and this is not priced into the markets. the markets have priced in the fact that china is slowing down but
as the democratic candidate for president of the united states. we have a pretty feisty audience. >> we have so many paul ryan fans. paul ryan, paul ryan, paul ryan! yes! yes, can you feel the love. i bet we have a lot of crimson tide fans, too. roll tide! >> it's all right. we have with us contribute mike barnicle and senior political analyst mark halperin and msnbc political analyst john heilemann, whose cover story for this week's "new york" magazine is on joe biden's role in the campaign. >> what a great cover. >> as we said, later today democrats will kick off their national convention here in north carolina, a state with 15 electoral votes up for grabs this november. president obama won north carolina by a microscopic number of votes in 2008. but a new poll shows the president will have his work cut out for him if he hopes to win here again. mitt romney currently leads the president 47% to 43%. one of the first orders of business will be to adopt the party platform. it echos president obama's call for higher taxes on wealthier americans while backing same-sex marriage and abortion rights. it s
opposition. overseas president obama restored the reputation of the united states within the community. dialling a and collaboration are once again possible with the return of spirit and trust and good will to our foreign policy. of course, there remains much to do. communities across america and countries around the world, life is too hard for too many people. we see their struggle and also our hearts go out to them. in the coming years our hands must continue to reach out to them. after all that remains to be done and at home and abroad, the evidence is overwhelming. president obama is a leader for america and we faison slaught of some of the most complicated and international challenges to confront any u.s. president in modern times. it is up to all of us to make sure that the american people understand exactly what is at stake. and at risk in this election. with president obama in oval office we can make good progress towards becoming a fairer, stronger, more prosperous america. and a nation adjusted to changing and challenging times, hold it true to unchanging principles. a leader
, perhaps even the first latino president of the united states. he knows full well why he was picked to give this speech. in his words he said, i'm young, and i'm hispanic. >> hey, everybody. i'm julian castro. >> reporter: first thing you need to know, it's pronounced julian castro. the j is silent. not julian. but even if you get the spanish wrong, don't worry. san antonio's mayor has never mastered spanish either. >> i understand it better than i speak it. i grew up in my household with my mother and grandmother mostly speaking english. i understand it, but speaking it back is always the challenge. >> reporter: julian castro's grandmother immigrated from mexico and worked in the chicano movement in san antonio. from the humble beginnings, julian and his twin brother went on to stanford university and harvard law school. now he is a rising star in the democratic party, tapped to give the keynote speech at the democratic convention, the same speech an unknown barack obama gave at the convention in 2004. >> you get talked about as someone who could be the first hispanic governor of texas. so
of nuclear missiles, getting way ahead of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the wes
is the only place in the united states that this has happened. but wars have often been an occasion for unity, for cohesion. you know, we are all in this together. we've all got to win this together, so we've got to put our more parochial interests aside and pulled together to win whatever word might be. but at the same time new york is a great magnet for immigrants from around the world, from its very earliest days in the 1620s onward, has been a place for discrete, separate populations of newcomers have often brought their own political cultures, the room loyalties and allegiances their ethnic and natural visages cultures and have ended up jostling each other. and especially at times of war come of this has the case in the year, sometimes the tragic consequences. i'm going to start by showing you these images, starting with the civil war. and again, the book starts well before that, but this is where we're starting tonight. so this is april of 1861 after the confederacy fired on fort sumter in the civil war began.
's exotic, grew up outside of the united states and yes, by the way, he is black. but this is -- this goes beyond that, because it really is -- i just think there's an edge to this one that we haven't seen. >> dana, you were just saying, that given all the attacks during the convention, the republican convention next week, it's not been of any great benefit to mitt romney. today we learn that the romney and ryan campaign are running robo calls and guess what's in the robo call, the president wants to raid medicare for $716 million and he's going to tax wheelchairs and pacemakers. i mean, if it failed during their convention, why do they keep doing this? >> and i expect next they'll come back again with that jamesville gm plant which has been discredited and that whole line about the simpson-bowles that paul ryan trotted out last week. so, you know, that doesn't seem to be working. you know, when you take something like the jamesville case that's flat wrong, that's one thing. gene does make an important case that welfare argument is more pernicious because it seems designed to divide people
plants in the united states and two of the most efficient coal-fire powered plants in the united states. we are now beginning to see both customers and shareholders the benefit of that building program. liz: now we're looking at a ten-year chart and it is a beautiful chart with the one tiny dip in 09 which everybody seemed to see. and again, since we're a business show where people are always looking for a great trade or a great stock to buy, this is something about you guys you know, you figure out ways to constantly move with what the atmosphere is doing, and that's why you are going to convert one of your plants at a pretty significant cost, from coal, you are going to convert one, i would assume you did the math and figure out it is best for business to do it this way? >> exactly, this particular power plant that we're about to convert is near downtown milwaukee which is where our headquarters building is. it is the only operating power plant inside the city limits of milwaukee. so it is a crucial piece of energy infrastructure to keep the lights on and keep voltage support for the
"brown v. board of education." think of cases that have interpreted the constitution of the united states around equal rights and so when we talk about the importance of the presidency it's certainly about the economic issues of that nature. but this could have impacts for hundreds of years. >> i do have to ask this question. there's going to be 28 women paraded on the stage tonight to talk about the power of the republican party. >> we only have 17% of women in congress. we only have 17 women senators, we only have six governors who are women we still have a very long way to go and when the house of representatives is having a hearing about access to birth control and the first panel is devoid of a woman, women women's voices aren't being heard. >> ifill: thank you both, one of those women is on the floor right now, that's congresswoman nidia valasquez of new york. >> i am proud to speak to you as a hispanic american. as a proud latina and a puerto rican. (cheers and applause) from being the first in my family to attend college to becoming the first latina to chair a full congressional c
was the president of the united states. >> as i understand it, a call for d.c. statehood is not part of the democratic platform this time around. have you -- what are your feelings about that? have you been able to express any concerns to the dnc chairwoman? >> actually, for the first time, all of the elements of d.c. statehood for the first time ever are in the platform. the platform says that the district of columbia is entitled to full and equal congressional rights [ indiscernible ] the economy and to a local government with no interference from the house or senate. that is the sum total of statehood, the words statehood for technical reasons -- i hope it's only for technical reasons -- are not in the platform but we have never had statehood spelled out in this way in the platform before. so that is not a real grievance this time of the we would like to get actual word "statehood" in, but in many ways it's more important to spell out what it means. >> so i may be being a bit too picky then because of the word statehood is not there. >> you're not. there are, of course, some peop
for president of the united states. >> republican presidential nominee mitt romney delivers his acceptance address and the last nine of the republican national convention. -- on the last night of the republican national convention. >> i can guarantee you this, it barack obama is reelected, you'll be right. >> mitt romney's speech was seen as the most important of his political life. but it may have been overshadowed by the republicans mystery speaker who turned out to the actor and director clint eastwood. >> i would just like to say something, ladies and gentlemen. something i think is very important is that you, we -- we own this country. [applause] >> the justice department dropped its investigation of cia interrogators for their role in the deaths of prisoners in iraq and afghanistan. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. mitt romney accepted the republican presidential nomination thursday night with a vow to revive the u.s. economy and a plea to voters disappointed with president obama's first term. >> ho
of the united states of america. last week the other party gave their sales pitch at their convention down in florida. >> boo! >> do not boo. vote. [applause] i have to say, it was something to see. despite all the challenges we face in this new century, we saw three straight days with an agenda out of last century. it was a rerun. you might as well have watched it on black-and-white tv with some rabbit ears. it should have been on nick at nite. if you did not dvr it, let me give you a basic recap of what they said. good the economy is bad. fault, andobama's hal governor romney has the secret to creating jobs and growing the economy. that is the basic summary. they spent the most time on me. they were talking about me, and there was a lot of hard truths and choices they said, but nobody bothered to tell you what they were, and when governor romney had his chance to let you in on the secret sauce of job creation, he did not offer you a single new idea. it was a retread of the same policies that have been sticking it to the middle class four years, and after the convention governor romney ca
york city was the vice capital of the united states. and it was an open secret it was the vice capital. it dangled more opportunities for prostitution, gambling and all-night drinking than any other city. 40,000 prostitutes worked in new york. some in brothels some on the street. there were illegal casinos, booking. this was the town teddy roosevelt was going clean it up in 1895. visitors could immediately sense the wicked possibility of the place. new york new york city had a nude weather vane. at the highest point in midtown see at the top of madison square. you can see it clearly from the ground and, you know, jay leno called the statute of liberty the hood ornament. nude diane was the hood ornament want breasts outstretched arms told new yorkers the direction of the winds. near madison square garden was the restaurant and can casino. there was a forgotten hotel there. and this housed one of the city great landmarks. it's a tame picture of it. you got a sense of an art gallery type bar. here's a better reason why thousands upon thousand of tourists came. william f a former manager c
. >> for the first time in centuries the president of the united states has officially declared himself an enemy of traditional marriage between one man and one woman. >> you are witness to a modern tale of resurrection. a second-coming. the bible speaks of lazarus, raised by jesus from the grave to walk again among the living. ralph reed, too, has been returned to life, political life. but he goes lazarus one further. lazarus was a poor man. reed is rich, and he just keeps getting richer from mixing religion and politics. and that's a story you don't want to miss. at age 33, ralph reed was the christian right's wonder boy. anointed in a 1995 "time" magazine cover story as the "right hand of god" for spinning the trust of conservative christians into political gold. it was reed who built the christian coalition of televangelist pat robertson into a powerful arm of the republican party. >> as religious conservatives we have finally gained what we have always sought. a place at the table, a sense of legitimacy and a voice in the conversation that we call democracy. >> in 2000, reed helped put geor
to the united states, you had a whole bunch of training in that area, particularly from king holmes who's still in seat and still a real leader in stds. and then you go back to in 1983 to africa with some of the same people that you were in the ebola epidemic with. you're in that massive, i mean, anybody that's ever been in africa knows what i'm talking about, massive colonial hospital. and you say in the book -- you wrote in your diary: incredible, a catastrophe for africa. this is what i want to work on. it will change everything. what was so incredible? what would change everything? what were you looking at in that hospital? >> the hospital, by the way, is the name of mbutu's mother. dictators seem to really love their mother, and they have something, and they name all kinds of things after their mother. [laughter] no, i had been there in '36, gone through -- '76, gone think the files, and here -- gone through the files. and suddenly they were full with young men and women, in these todays of my age, and dying. emaciated and all kinds of infections, just name it. and we had, like, 100 cases
of challenges they face. >> yeah, i think school districts are pretty much the same across the united states in dealing with issues. i think we're still have struggling with the economy and i think that is a challenge for us. as enrollment grows, we need more staff to deal with that but we may not have the revenue. i think that will be the biggest challenge for my successor to figure out how to balance that. >> we wish you well. we appreciate so much you happening with us this morning and happy retirement to you. >> that is 10 months away. >> you got a little ways to go. >> thank you so much. >> kind of exciting for him too. >> to close a chapter and then for fairfax county schools to end one and go to the next chapter. >> start a new one. you kind of saw our live shot out there, a little gray and a little overcast too as they start their first day back. >> might be a few peeks of sunshine. much of the day will be kind of cloudy. it feels like miami outside right now. >> without the beach. >> without the beach and the sea breeze. >> right. >> other than that, just like miami. 76 right now in
manufacturing contracting here in the united states. yesterday, we learned it's contracting in the china for the first time since november and in europe, it continues to contract. and yet, you think that the market is well supported here, why? >> i think it's going to be a range bound market. i think right now, we're in the tougher end of the range. there are two things that are supporting the market. one, there is an economic value to entities and so the lbo or acquisition value is providing support. to the extent companies return cash to shareholders, that offers some support. >> do you see many acquisitions in the market at the moment? >> no, and that's one of the things that's been surprising and disappointing at the same time. it's interesting. there are areas of the market where you've seen capital flow to economic opportunity. for example, buying single family homes to rent them out. which is an arbitrage that was made available by the decline housing prices you haven't seen a comparable level of activity on the corporate side, which is surprising. there are a couple of opportunit
of gas because they do not exploit the natural gas is that we have. in the united states, with the unemployment we have in arkansas and california together. host: what kind of business to you own? caller: i am a consultant. i get the call when they are in trouble. host: danny, texas. good morning. are you better off than you were four years ago? caller: that is kind of hypothetical. i have started my plumbing business. i got my master plumbers license f -- five years ago. i hired two more. i had three people on the payroll. i have let all but one of them go. i was hiring to people and three people as needed. now i am down to one full-time employee. i have hired one as needed. i am doing the bookwork myself. my secretary had been helping me two days out of the week. new construction not being there, that was one of the lead models for people. i am holding my own, but it is hurting the family that i had working for me. why has nothing on the father's dream book come out? why have all the major radio stations and television stations not stated any of this information? that i
of the united states. can you handle that kind of pressure? >> i would be lying if i said that's not flattering. it's flattering to everybody. but the biggest mistake i can make is to believe the press, to believe the hype. >> he was elected mayor in 2009 and re-elected with 82% of the vote. now he's 37, the youngest mayor of a top 50 city in the united states. he's also used to the baby face jokes. >> i think one of the funnier things that has happened to you when you first met president barack obama he jokingly asked if you were the intern. >> that's right. >> you being asked to do the speech is that making up for that jab. >> i don't know. i don't know. i always got the age jokes at different points in my career. >> is it still happening? >> every now and then. but i'm starting to get the gray hair from my 3-year-old daughter and from politics. >> this is the biggest speech of castro's career. latinos enjoyed prominent speaking roles at the republican convention and castro must convince latinos to stick with president barack obama. >> president obama has not been a friend of the latino commu
of cases that have interpreted the constitution of the united states around equal rights and so when we talk about the importance of the presidency it's certainly about the economic issues of that nature. but this could have impacts for hundreds of years. >> i do have to ask this question. there's going to be 28 women paraded on the stage tonight to talk about the power of the republican party. >> we only have 17% of women in congress. we only have 17 women senators, we only have six governors who are women we still have a very long way to go and when the house of representatives is having a hearing about access to birth control and the first panel is devoid of a woman, women women's voices aren't being heard. >> ifill: thank you both, one of those women is on the floor right now, that's congresswoman nidia valasquez of new york. >> i am proud to speak to you as a hispanic american. as a proud latina and a puerto rican. (cheers and applause) from being the first in my family to attend college to becoming the first latina to chair a full congressional committee in congress, my story has
to boycott all the unilateral actions of people from another part of the world? the united states is not very popular in the middle east right now. i don't know if you doe know that. it's not popular at all. everything that's been talked about, everything that's been done has not moved us forward. if anything, it's moved us backward because there is just not a sense of well-being in the relationship. oil being part of it but other issues also enter into it. >> and what's your take on the upcoming election, the presidential election. how does that skew things? >> you know, i don't want to get out of my depth here. i'm not a politician. i am a businessperson. but i would say this. and i'll stick to energy. there is no energy plan in the obama administration. i've been saying that for years. they talk words, rhetoric. rhetoric is not a plan. a plan has accountabilities, actions, milestones and real numbers. the romney announcement is also not a plan. it's a good strategic intent. it's inclined towards americans taking care of america. i certainly support that notion, but i'm still waiting to see
was basically the here sherlock holmes of the united states and incredible reputation of the dblght. he made himself rich by taking gifts. he-- roosevelt could not tolerate the behavior. a world wind trying to swept the corrupt era out. you can't imagine the courage of the man to come in to a city that was this corrupt and this used to doing it a certain way and reckless reformers attitude change the whole place around. it's amazing. anyhow, arthur wrote a front page item ten days in to roosevelt's tenure for the new york world, he say we have a real police commissioner his name is though door vees roosevelt. he speaking english accurately. i done it or i seen it. he talks more like a boston man or englishman than a new york police commissioner. the voice is the hardest trial. it is an campus rating voice, a raspy voice. what do you amount to anyway? in the good old days the own of a voice would have been clubbed. now the bravest policeman must listen to the voice, obey it and seem to like it. they treated roosevelt very well in the beginning. a month in to the job he did something unusual.
the united states are on the ground. they have converged on this region. i have seen them in the last eight days that we have been here to put up new lines. they're working hard to get service restored and the very latest numbers coming to us from entergy, the utility provider here, now that 95% of service has been restored and they expect the other 5% to be restored by the end of the day with the exception of those extremely hard-hit flooded areas. and as all of the evacuation orders are lifted, some folks going in for the first time and seeing the damage, listen to their reaction. >> i see it on tv i hear about it. but i never witnessed myself. to see it really for the first time like this, it is inspiring. makes your eyes water a little bit. >> it is out of here now. we're trying to get our lives back together and trying to get our places back where we can live in them. >> reporter: very preliminary estimates put isaac's damage at nearly $2 billion. jenna? jenna: wow! casey, thank you. >> reporter: you got it. jon: some problems overseas now. activists say hundreds of homes in a syrian b
up. >> make it sounds like the president of the united states is bystander. he is the president. >> sean, this question came to me. he did not --. bill: sean, give sean the final seconds of this delayed satellite. sean, 10 seconds. go. >> the bottom line is the president didn't lead. americans aren't better off. you can't keep making excuses why things didn't get done. need to replace this president with mitt romney and paul ryan who have a plan to move america forward bottom line. >> maybe next time he does a convention speech he have can tell us what that plan is. bill: next time we put you in the. >> mitt romney.com. 59 points to get the economy moving forward. bill: here's martha. martha: well, all right, we have 63 days to go, folks, until the election and it is all about that narrow slice of folks who have still not made up their mind out there. a brand new poll shows mitt romney with a slight lead in a state that president obama won last time around. which one is it? we'll show you when we come back. more "america's newsroom" live music: "make someone happy" music: "make
. i get the spirit of it. >> not much change in the top selling beers in the united states. chicago-based market research firm similar symphony ri has bud light selling the most cases of beers in supermarkets, drugstores and gas stations for $5.4 billion in sales last year. but wiser coors light, miller lite and natural lite round out the top five. the closest brews of what could be considered a craft beer are yingling and blue moon at number 19 on that list. >> bill: that is all taken before the recipe of the white house beer was released. that having been released over the weekend -- >> stay tuned! >> bill: stay tuned. i think it is honey blonde, honey brown. there are three of them. honey brown honey blonde. i forget the third one. as soon as i get back to washington, i'm going to get that recipe. i'm determined to get my hands on a bottle of that beer. talk to all of my friends at the white house. as we said, here at the democratic national convention, expect a different kind of show. i think a much more
fire has been tough to fight. it's been tough for the west coast of the united states. >>> also this morning, brand-new details on the shocking case about the u.s. open tennis umpire charged with murdering her husband. her daughter speaking out this morning. why she says the allegations are, and i quote, insane. >> all that coming up. >>> but we do begin on the gulf coast. so many areas still under water, almost a week after hurricane isaac tore through the region. president obama broke off the campaign trail to visit one of the hardest hit neighborhoods in louisiana. and ryan owens brings us the latest from new orleans this morning. good morning, ryan. >> reporter: good morning, george. you know, the presidential visit to a disaster zone has become a bit of a ritual. the president was here to shake hands and promise more federal help. the commander in chief as consoler in chief. >> how are you all doing? >> better now. >> i know it's a mess. but just wanted to come by and let you know, we know it's a mess. >> reporter: president obama met with victims of hurricane isaac late mo
% of the budget. >>> back in the united states, the new york attorney general is investigating whether private equity firms have abused tax strategy in order to cut hundreds of millions from their tax bills. eric schneiderman wants documents that reveal whether they converted certain fgt fees into investments which are taxed at a lower rate than ordinary xhk. economy. schneiderman is looking to see if he's trying to embarrass bain. andrew, right now, i'll send it over to you. >> fascinating story. hope we talk about that in a little bit. corporate headlines this morning. valiant pharmaceuticals is buying metacis for $24 a share. a 39% premium. the deal boosting valiant skin care offering and adds botox to it's portfolio. oracle is launching an appeal on five-year long court case against s.a.p. last month they agreed to pay oracle $306 million over copyright infringement allegations. great to be back. what do you think, a little right here in. >> i've never heard of disport? >> botox? >> you're not who i'm worried about. it's clear by saying you might need it, i know what you're actually saying
-growing metropolitan area in the united states. we have been adding new jobs but not fast enough. we have a good healthy diverse economy that will see us through over the long run. >> all the ancillary towns as well especially with hotels and things like that. >> absolutely from a direct economic impact but the bigger picture, charlotte has never played on this largest age before. we have been about building charlotte over the last half century or so. this is our debut. the largest such event we ever hosted and the eyes of the world are upon us. most of your viewers and visitors have never been to charlotte before. we have a very positive city to show to our visitors and to the world and there are a lot of people we have talked to on your staff talking about how we can figure out how to move to charlotte. it is a positive product in the business of selling charlotte. tracy: thank you very much. >> thank you as welcome back. tracy: bank of america's headquarters. ashley: big banking community. the nasdaq and s&p turning positive in the last hour and the dow fighting to join them. you don't want t
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